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5 Amazing Temple in Bali

This is top 5 Amazing Temple in Bali take you straight to the ‘can’t miss’ cultural treasures and famous landscapes found all around the magical island of Bali. There are innumerable temples, historical sites, and spots of natural beauty spread across eight regencies. This narrowing-down of choices will get you discovering the best of Bali in no time. Go east to see the majestic ‘mother temple’ of Besakih or travel to the heartland where rice paddies offer scenic photo opportunities. From scenic vistas to cultural performances, there is something for everyone.

1.Besakih Temple

Besakih Temple, known as Bali’s ‘Mother Temple’ for over 1,000 years, sits 1,000 metres high on the southwestern slopes of Mount Agung. Besakih is an artistic and unique complex that comprises at least 86 temples which include the main Pura Penataran Agung (the Great Temple of State) and 18 others. Besakih is the biggest and holiest of the island’s temples and is surrounded by breathtaking and scenic rice paddies, hills, mountains, streams, and more.

The best visiting times of the day are in the early morning and in the evening as the complex is much quieter during these hours. The official guides are easily identifiable with their symmetrically patterned traditional Batik shirts. The service is not free, though not expensive at all either considering how big the complex is. There’s no obligation to hire a guide for tours around the complex. Sarongs and sashes are available for rent. They’re also available for purchase at the many stalls outside, and bargaining is recommended. Women on their periods are forbidden entry. Don’t forget to change money in the more urban areas as the rates here are not reliable.

2. Tanah Lot Temple

Tanah Lot Temple is one of Bali’s most important landmarks, famed for its unique offshore setting and sunset backdrops. An ancient Hindu shrine perched on top of an outcrop amidst constantly crashing waves; Tanah Lot Temple is simply among Bali’s not-to-be-missed icons. The onshore site is dotted with smaller shrines alongside visitors’ leisure facilities that comprise restaurants, shops and a cultural park presenting regular dance performances. The temple is located in the Beraban village of the Tabanan regency, an approximate 20km northwest of Kuta, and is included on most tours to Bali’s western and central regions.

Although you cannot enter the temple grounds, the panoramic views and cultural offerings are highlights to enjoy. On the holy day of Kuningan, five days prior to the temple’s anniversary date, the heirloom pilgrimage is one of Bali’s festive parades worth witnessing. Tanah Lot’s piodalan falls on every Wednesday that follows each Kuningan on Bali’s 210-day Pawukon calendar. Dress and act respectfully as on any temple visit in Bali.

3. Uluwatu Temple

Uluwatu Temple, or Pura Luhur Uluwatu, one of six key temples believed to be Bali’s spiritual pillars, is renowned for its magnificent location, perched on top of a steep cliff approximately 70 metres above sea level. This temple also shares the splendid sunset backdrops as that of Tanah Lot Temple, another important sea temple located in the island’s western shores. Pura Luhur Uluwatu is definitely one of the top places on the island to go to for sunset delights, with direct views overlooking the beautiful Indian Ocean and daily Kecak dance performances. Balinese architecture, traditionally-designed gateways, and ancient sculptures add to Uluwatu Temple’s appeal.

Behind the main shrine in one of the courtyards of Uluwatu Temple lies a Brahmin statue facing the Indian Ocean, considered as a representation of Dhang Hyang Dwijendra. The two entrances to the temple area are split gates with leaves and flowers carvings. In front of each of them are a couple of sculptures shaped like a human body with an elephant head. A heritage of the 10th century is the one-piece winged stone gate to the inside courtyard of Pura Uluwatu. Winged gates are not commonly found on the island. An addition to Pura Uluwatu in the 16th century is Pura Dalem Jurit. There are three statues in it, one of them is of Brahma. There are two stone troughs in the temple area. If both of them are joined, they create a sarchopagus (Megalithic coffin). Uluwatu Beach, below the cliff, is one of Bali’s best internationally-known surfing spots.

4. Goa Gajah Temple

Goa Gajah’s name is slightly misleading, lending the impression that it’s a gigantic dwelling full of elephants. Nevertheless, Goa Gajah ‘Elephant Cave’ is an archaeological site of significant historical value that makes it a special place to visit. Located on the cool western edge of Bedulu Village, six kilometres out of central Ubud, you do not need more than an hour to descend to its relic-filled courtyard and view the rock-wall carvings, a central meditational cave, bathing pools and fountains.

Even though the site’s name translates into ‘Elephant Cave’, you won’t find any pachyderms here. Various theories suggest the origin of the name, such as back in time the Petanu River was originally called ‘Lwa Gajah’, meaning the ‘River Gajah’, before it came to be called Petanu River. Other sources state that the ‘Gajah’ or elephant aspect came from the stone figure inside the cave depicting the Hindu lord Ganesh, who is characterised by an elephant’s head. Ancient inscriptions also allude to the name Antakunjarapada, which roughly translates to ‘elephant’s border’. The cave’s entrance shows a menacing giant face with its wide open mouth as the door. Various motifs depicting the forest and animals are carved out of the outer rock face. The giant face was considered to be that of an elephant’s.

5. Ulundanu Temple

The Ulun Danu Beratan Temple is both a famous picturesque landmark and a significant temple complex located on the western side of the Beratan Lake in Bedugul, central Bali. The whole Bedugul area is actually a favorite cool upland weekend and holiday retreat for locals and island visitors alike from the southern and urban areas, as it is strategically located, connecting the island’s north and south. Ulun Danu Beratan, literally ‘the source temple of Lake Beratan’, is easily the island’s most iconic sanctuary sharing the scenic qualities with the seaside temples of Uluwatu and Tanah Lot. The smooth reflective surface of the lake surrounding most of the temple’s base creates a unique floating impression, while the mountain range of the Bedugul region encircling the lake provides the temple with a scenic backdrop.


Ulun Danu Beratan temple’s anniversary ceremony or Piodalan takes place every Kliwon Julungwangi Tuesday on the Pawukon Balinese calendar cycle which occurs every 210 days. Also a grander Piodalan Agung takes place every 420 days. However, on any other regular day the serene lake views and cool uplands are an experience itself. Visits to the Ulun Danu Beratan temple are subject to an entrance fee of IDR 7,500 for domestic tourists and IDR 10,000 for foreigners. Those who want more than scenery may hire traditional jukung outriggers to tour the lake as well as motorized boats for a quicker ride. The other side of the Beratan Lake also offers various water sports such as parasailing and jet-skis. Close to the temple complex visitors can hire fishing gear and bait to pass the time away on the lakeside. The Eka Karya Botanical Gardens is also a highlight of the Bedugul region, with access located nearby.

Taken From: http://www.bali-indonesia.com/